1/25

Dr. Zhivegas Plays Prince

All Ages | 8 pm

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Dr. Zhivegas Plays Prince

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    1/26

    4th Ave

    Rayla
    Aja9

    All Ages | 2 pm

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    4th Ave

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      Rayla

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        Aja9

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          1/26

          An Evening with Play Dead

          All Ages | 8 pm

          An Evening with Play Dead

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            2/2

            Gekko

            All Ages | 8 pm

            Gekko

            Formed in January of 2013 in KCMO, Gekko is a tight group with an unusually strong chemistry. With musical influences ranging from funk and soul to heavy metal and every thing in between, Gekko is a melting pot of different sounds. Dedicated to their craft, they strive for an intense live show.

            Gekko's first studio album: "A Gecko Named Terrance" (2014), marks humble beginnings for the band and a search for their sound (and name). Funky bridges with intricate melodies, followed by sweeping chorus' makes for an incredible music experience. The transition of sounds between funk, to rock, to jazz, to postmodern, tied together by a fat bass, a soothing guitar, and a high rainfall of pitter-patter drums, give this album a thick airiness. Provoked by confidence edged with self-doubt, and fueled by angst, Gekkos's first " ...record has the ultimate way of convincing you to just relax.".

            With a unique music style that is a mashup of many different genres. Their live performances are a combination of structured composition and free formed improvisation. Proficient with their instruments, Gekko introduces new concepts and melodies in their improvs with ease. Drifting in and out of thought-out melodic tunes and face-melting psycidellic improvisation, this band will keep you on your toes. Gekko is constantly bringing new songs into their ever growing grab bag of music, each performance is guaranteed to be one of a kind. Preforming on stages and for events such as the Wakarusa Music Festival, Paola Roots Festival, the Granada Theater, and many more, they are an experienced breed of musicians. Bringing the crowd into their world, there concerts are an experience that is not easily forgotten.

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            2/8

            Thunderkat

            All Ages | 7 pm

            Thunderkat

            Based in Lawrence, Kansas, ThunderKat stands as the city’s premier 80s hard rock cover band. Voted by Best of Lawrence from 2013-2016 as a top local act, the band delivers a diverse collection of hits from Motley Crue, Poison, Bon Jovi, Def Leppard, Journey, AC/DC, Night Ranger, Billy Idol, Van Halen, Joan Jett, Prince and more. You won’t want to miss the ear-splitting spectacle of ThunderKat!

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            2/12

            Lucy Dacus

            Illuminati Hotties

            All Ages | 8 pm

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            Lucy Dacus

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              Illuminati Hotties

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                2/14

                The Floozies

                Too Many Zooz
                Dreamers Delight

                All Ages | 8 pm

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                The Floozies

                Just outside the jazz mecca of Kansas City springs liberal oasis Lawrence, Kansas—separated only by the waves of wheat from the epicenter of the electronic music revolution in Colorado. From Lawrence, it would logically follow that an act could rise to prominence fueled by the swing of Basie, the birth of Charlie Parker’s bebop, and the wild frontier of electronica. Born in funk and bred in the digital age, live electronic duo The Floozies have burst onto the scene at a time when the industry needed them the most.

                Brothers Matt and Mark Hill share the stage just as easily as they share a musical brain. Without a setlist, and without a word between them, Matt’s guitar is in lockstep with the thud of Mark’s kick. Endless looping and production builds the raw scenery upon which palm muted chugs, searing solos, and wobbling bass paint their dazzling array of colors.

                Well versed in everything from Chris Cornell to Kavinsky, the sonic vision shared by the brothers eschews contemporary electronic influences in favor of broader, deeper tastes including Zapp & Roger, Lettuce, and Amon Tobin. That wide-angle view of a century of popular music allows the Hills to remix Toto and The Dead—in the music you can hear reverence for the giants of the past, all the while producing wildly futuristic tunes for the masses to dig now.

                When the pendulum swung as far as it could away from live instrumentation to laptops, The Floozies rose up to the challenge, swinging as hard as they could in the other direction with neck-snapping, knee-breaking funk so dirty that the gatekeepers stood up, wiped themselves off, and took notice. A bold live show full of sonic exploration and unbreakably deep pocket grooves has landed the brothers on stage with luminaries of the jam world Umphrey’s McGee as readily as electronic elites GRiZ and Big Gigantic. A nationwide tour with Archnemesis and Wick-it The Instigator cemented the duo’s ascent while major festival appearances at Wakarusa, Summer Camp, Kanrocksas, and Sonic Bloom dot the horizon.

                The Floozies are bringing the funk back, and they’re right on time.

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                Too Many Zooz

                Nyc born brasshouse trio



                  Dreamers Delight


                  Biography
                  2018 is promising to be a huge year ahead for Denver-based producer Dreamers Delight. As the electronic brainchild of Reed Krafft, Dreamers Delight has escalated at an incredible rate across the US, and has garnered an impressive international following and significant outreach from fans. Combining the cultural influence gained from world travel and his knack for soulful, intelligently produced melodies, Krafft is leading a charged campaign that is quickly gaining momentum and turning heads throughout the electronic music world.



                    2/15

                    Cursive

                    Summer Cannibals
                    The Campdogzz

                    All Ages | 7 pm

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                    Cursive

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                    Summer Cannibals

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                      The Campdogzz

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                        2/20

                        Eminence Ensemble

                        All Ages | 8 pm

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                        Eminence Ensemble

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                          2/23

                          Cory Phillips and the Band of Light

                          All Ages | 8 pm

                          Cory Phillips and the Band of Light

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                            2/28

                            Nick Schnebelen Band

                            Dust Devil Choir

                            All Ages | 7 pm

                            Nick Schnebelen Band

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                              Dust Devil Choir

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                                3/2

                                Spafford

                                All Ages | 8 pm

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                                Spafford

                                Spafford is a four piece funk rock act hailing from Phoenix, Arizona. The band is comprised of Brian Moss (Guitar), Jordan Fairless (Bass), Andrew “Red” Johnson (Keys), and Cameron Laforest (Drums). Refusing to be restricted to any musical boundaries, Spafford seamlessly blends together an eclectic mixture of all of their collective musical experience. The heart of their sound is rooted in deep sonic exploration with a focus on improvisational elements. With jams stretching well beyond the typical structures of their songs, fans have flocked to their live shows to experience the unique energy captured within each performance. A focus on blending genres with a deep foundation of patient groove building has helped craft a sound all their own. Formed in 2012 by happenstance, the band has been building an organic fanbase in the Southwestern United States through word of mouth ever since. As the secret has gotten out Spafford has moved onto national touring, sharing the stage on a coast to coast tour with jam heavyweights Umphrey’s Mcgee in 2017. Reaching the next level in their ascent in an ever changing jam band landscape, Spafford has risen to the top of the next wave of acts by providing quality improvisation and a truly unique musical experience. Spafford has hit the road full time and is bringing their high energy performances nationwide.

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                                3/9

                                Shaw Davis & the Black Ties

                                All Ages | 8 pm

                                Shaw Davis & the Black Ties

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                                  3/15

                                  Wick-It the Instigator

                                  All Ages | 8 pm

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                                  Wick-It the Instigator

                                  He’s got a reputation for doing some thoughtfully fresh and mindblowingly original remixes that take him from beyond a standard dub step or mash-up artist to a DJ/producer with skills that have turned heads and caught ears all over the Southeast. In a live setting, he sends people off with his mix of humor, ingenious pop culture samples and beats that can’t be touched. While his roots are firmly planted in hip hop, there is no shortage of heavy electronic bass music at a Wick-it show.

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                                  3/27

                                  Dilly Dally

                                  All Ages | 7 pm

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                                  Dilly Dally

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                                    3/30

                                    The Real Zebos

                                    Essenger
                                    Sons of Stereo
                                    Faintheart

                                    All Ages | 7 pm

                                    The Real Zebos

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                                      Essenger

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                                        Sons of Stereo

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                                          Faintheart

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                                            4/1

                                            Caamp

                                            Ona

                                            All Ages | 7 pm

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                                            Caamp

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                                              Ona

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                                                4/5

                                                Plini

                                                Mestis
                                                Dave Mackay

                                                All Ages | 7 pm

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                                                Plini

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                                                  Mestis

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                                                    Dave Mackay

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                                                      4/7

                                                      Mom Jeans

                                                      All Ages | 7 pm

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                                                      Mom Jeans

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                                                        4/9

                                                        Copeland

                                                        From Indian Lakes
                                                        Many Rooms

                                                        All Ages | 7 pm

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                                                        Copeland

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                                                          From Indian Lakes

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                                                            Many Rooms

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                                                              4/13

                                                              BIG SMO

                                                              18 & Over | 8 pm

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                                                              BIG SMO

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                                                              The Bottleneck Interview with Jamie Laurie of Flobots



                                                              flobots1

                                                              Flobots (image via http://liveloudmedia.com/flobots)

                                                              Denver-based alternative hip hop band Flobots play The Bottleneck October 28th. Jamie Laurie recently discussed artists that inspired him to love hip hop, creative process and his passion to create music without boundaries.

                                                              What first got you starting out in music? How’d you get going? What was your first musical memory?
                                                              I remember in 5th grade people making fun of me like, “Hey, what kind of music do you like? Why don’t you listen to music?” It wasn’t in my world. I wasn’t thinking about who my favorite band was. Once I did start listening, the first tape ever, honestly, was Willie Nelson. My dad had this tape of Willie Nelson and I liked the songs on there, then I got into the stuff that was on the radio. The first hip-hop I was into was J.J. Fad and Supersonic. Just stuff on the radio that still I think holds up pretty well.
                                                              I like Young MC and some of that pop stuff, but before long I got really into more They Might Be Giants and R.E.M. and some of the alternative radio stuff. I think it was really De La Soul and Native Tongues were some of the first hip hop artists I was into. Pretty soon after that, I was into more revolutionary hip hop like the Coup. They are still some of my favorite or most formative, influences for that.
                                                              The early ’90’s was a pretty great time for hip hop with Hieroglyphics, Outkast, the Roots and all those groups expanding what the music could be. I fell in love with West Coast underground. Quantum, Living Legends, Soulsides, all that stuff.

                                                              Quantum is really something else. Those beats are so fresh.
                                                              It’s amazing. It was an experience actually going into the industry, making the music myself. It was amazing getting a chance to meet some of those folks and have them, for a second, treat me like a peer when I’m still just looking at them like a fan.

                                                              Your music, it goes beyond styles. You’re not boxed in at all. You’re doing your thing.
                                                              Right. That’s one of the things I always admire. Especially about West Coast underground at the time. I always felt like people on the East Coast, because that’s where hip hop sort of lived in the ’90s. It’s like “Oh, that’s where the real hip hop is” people. In my little mind, it was like those people sound more similar, but I would listen to the range between E-40 and the Grouch. We were exploring. They’re just doing absolutely completely different things.
                                                              I fell in love with the ability of artists who really find their own personal style and that became an ambition for me. When Flobots really got going, we thought, at that point there were no barriers, even musically. What do we have to sound like? What does the music have to sound like? The Roots had shown that we could be a live band and be an authentic hip hop group. I think, for us, it was like, “Look, we’re coming out of Denver, Colorado. We’re coming out of very different social conditions than many other artists. We have things to say that we could say, that are unique to us and that’s why every one of us are on this Earth is just express our own truths most fully.” So we thought, there’s no boundaries anymore. Let’s have a viola. If there’s a viola player that’s excited about this band and wants to be part of it, let’s start there. Let’s bring in live musicians. Let’s just be ourselves as fully as we can be and that’s what music’s all about.

                                                              flobots2

                                                              Flobots (image via http://www.facebook.com/theflobots)

                                                              Don’t you feel like having a live band with you, doesn’t that push you lyrically? It gets you fired up as well.
                                                              It does and it also forces you to think responsively to the music. There’s songs where it’s like, “Alright. This music’s really busy, so I need to be simple.” Or, “Hey, this one is a whole lot of space, so now I can fill it in.” It’s definitely a lot more to think about in the creative process, because it’s not just put on the beat and I’ll do a rap. it’s what is the emotional journey of this song going to be and how can I contribute to that with my lyrics.

                                                              Kind of like adding to the sound or pulling away from the sound? Contrast?
                                                              Right, absolutely. I think, hip hop is doing very well these days because so many people have thought about so many different things. You look at Kanye, who was a producer first for at least a decade and then starts bringing in the lyrics and it’s no surprise that his lyrics feel like they’ve been put together by a producer. Like, “Alright, where do I want to take people? How clear do I want to be? How cryptic do I want to be? What’s the crescendo of this verse?” He’s thinking about those things. I think that makes better music when people pay attention to, how does the emotional arc of the verse match the emotional arc of the music and vice versa?

                                                              Taking people on a full journey with a song.
                                                              Right. It challenges you to think, maybe, more in depth. I revise way more than I ever did before. I used to go, “Okay, what’s the music? Cool? I wrote a verse. Alright, I’m done.” Now it’s like, “Wait, maybe that verse isn’t everything it could be. Let’s try a new verse.” On the new album we have, I have probably written 3-4 verses for every song and I love where it ended up.

                                                              Basically, you’ve gotten better at drafting ideas.
                                                              Exactly. Honestly, it took me a while to not be stubborn because I’d be like, “What are you talking about? I already wrote a verse for that. It’s done. No, I can’t change that word because then I’d have to change that other word.” I’ve just learned to have more confidence in the finished product. I think of it like a sculpture where you, you know there’s something that already lives in that rock and your job is to remove the parts that are obstructing it. By the end, it’s like I’ve peeled back all the layers and revealed what the song really is. It’s taken a while, as an artist, to be humble enough to realize that the first thing I did wasn’t necessarily the work of genius that I thought it was in that moment.

                                                              That’s got to be a fun challenge, looking over your past work and trying to expand all the time. You never want to stagnate.
                                                              Right. Exactly. There’s lots of ways to move forward. You can move forward by just creating a whole lot of things or you can move forward by saying, “Alright, let’s keep wrestling with this song until it is so undeniably compelling that you know it’s finished.”

                                                              You never want to put anything unfinished out there. You have a certain standard of what you want. How often do you find yourself writing songs? How often do you find yourself writing lyrics? Is it every day or is there a certain time of day that works for you?
                                                              It’s fun to do in the morning. It’s fun to just get up and write but, honestly, it’s all over the map. There was a year, 2010, where I actually made a commitment that every day I would put a new verse up on YouTube and so I did this thing called “The Rhyme of the Day.” It basically meant I wrote a new verse every day. Sometimes, I used old ones that I’d never put out. That was really as a creative exercise. As a artist you can have this feeling, “I have all these ideas. When am I going to get to try them?” In the course of a band where a song is a big production that involves a lot of people, it was easy to think like, “I never get to write a verse that just speaks to what happened that day in the news, or whatever whim I had that day,” so it’s the little idea factory needed to be satiated. Taking a year to just indulge in that was pretty gratifying.
                                                              In the process of the last two years of writing this album, it was kind of a back and forth. Someone would come with a bass line and it’s, “Alright, let me react to that bass line. Here’s a verse that reacts to that bass line. Now, based off that verse, we want to do a new bass line. Okay, cool. Let’s bring in this guitar, this. Oh, look the song has evolved and now it’s not really about what it was about. Now, it’s more about this. Alright, let’s do a new verse, let’s try that out.” I don’t know if you ever worked with a t-shirt designer or someone who’s like, “Here’s some potential logos. Here are seven ideas. I like this one, can you take that and expand it?” It kind of feels cool to be a craftsman like that too and also to reach back into that crafts place back into the soul place and see what I’m doing. Let’s go back to what I’m trying to say and what is authentic to me about the song.

                                                              Everything is tied into each other, connected, like in the creative process.
                                                              Exactly and songs reveal themselves. We have a song on the new album called “Carousel.” I’m trying to remember what we thought it was about in the beginning, but now it’s very clear. It’s a song about that feeling when you’re just playing with your phone, looking for something that you will never find. Whether it’s laying in bed late at night or in the early morning before you get out of bed, just being stuck in this little swirl of this pretend world of likes and follows and instant approval from other people that you’re seeking. I think it consumes so many of us. The song’s about that. The Carousel is that. It took a while to figure that out. First, it was just this chorus, this other set of ideas. It’s exciting when you listen to the song and let it reveal itself to you.

                                                              Yeah sure. We should definitely talk about that too. How do you approach a live show differently than your work in the studio? How do you go about it?
                                                              For us, the way we came up in Denver was because of our live show. My grandpa used to say, “Your audience is like a greased pig. If they can get away from you, they will.” We think of it from the audience perspective. If I was standing out there, what would I want? What would hold my attention? What would I actually feel good about if I paid and came to a show, brought some friends and told them to trust me, this is going to be good? What are the things that I would want to see happen? How would I want to feel? Were there elements of the show that would actually engage me?
                                                              We put a lot of energy into the live show. It’s great having a live band because if you have a bad ass viola solo right before lyrics that captivate people, all of those things go a long way. We really look at our shows as almost like church for a secular world. Come here, we want you to move your ass, want you to intellectually be on board but we want to touch your soul too. We try to send people on a journey that at the end of the night they’ll be like, “Hey, I’m satisfied, I feel good.”
                                                              With the election and the climate in the country, it’s really easy to sit at your computer, look at Facebook and just be like, “Hey, we all hate each other. Everyone’s a horrible person and there’s no hope for anything.” Actually, that’s not true and the best way to remind ourselves it’s not true is just to be in a community of people where we can actually celebrate just getting together. It doesn’t mean there’s not things that need desperately to be transformed, because we do. We need social movements. We need to confront hard questions about police violence or climate change. Those need to be transformed. Those systems need to be transformed to be more human things. We can do that in a way that invites everybody into the process and to the solution.

                                                              Music, live especially, is the catalyst for positive change.
                                                              Yeah, I think it definitely can be. It can be a lot of things, it can be catharsis, it can rally, be a place to pour out our anger, pour out our pain but the over all effect of doing that in a group of people is that we remember that we are not alone. I think that’s the problem where you sit at your computer and you have all these feelings, but you have them by yourself. There’s no affirmation of ultimately moving towards something because there’s other people that feel the same way and we can do something about it. The concert is a shortcut to that feeling. That’s why it was important for us to go out on a show where we’re doing this, really, because we just looked at the situation right now and we need to be out there talking to people.

                                                              Making something happen.
                                                              It reminds us that we’re not alone, you know?

                                                              Yeah, of course. It benefits everybody.
                                                              Right, exactly. Anyway, thank you to whomever is reading this. If you’re not sure about coming to the show, come to the show. We promise you it’ll be a good time. Even if you never listen to our music or think you don’t agree with our politics or something, come to the show. We want to see everybody there.

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